'Life is everywhere, even in the most developed of spaces!' The Long Listen Podcast with Ian Boyd & Joe Redston

Perfect Friday listening.. or anytime listening in fact! Our naturalist/ecologist Ian Boyd’s interview for Joe Redston's podcast series covers the collective work here at Artecology, Arc and our not-for-profit The Common Space, and answers all your questions with wide-angled, practical advice on nature, wildlife, urban conservation, plus community regeneration.

Listen out for…

* What's a naturalist and why we believe nature engagement and outreach is all-important… when bugs aren't insects and the extraordinary lightbulb moment that even a hint of taxonomy sparks in a schoolyard...

* How can we gain maximum ecological value from the built world - understanding punctuation, wildlife’s territory and travel plans...

* The Three-Pot Planet or how to create your own ecosystem (think edible, niche and caterpillars not butterflies!) And much more!

https://bit.ly/2DicFJo

Thanks for the visit Joe!


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What every Sustainability Manager should know about biodiversity....

Ian Boyd Ecologist and co-founder of Artecology is here to help!

What do we mean by ‘Natural Capital’? Click here…..

Biodiversity has become a handy, all-purpose eco-tag. It might be swapped as if synonymous with ‘wildlife’ or ‘the natural world’ or used even more generously to denote the environment at large. And none of that is so much wrong as less practically useful than it might be.

Biodiversity is fundamentally about variety, the richness of flora and fauna that exists and interacts in a place and at a time. This isn’t a very different definition to the more general applications, but it does focus attention on the ideas of species richness and habitat complexity, tools to build more sustainable spaces for people and wildlife alike. Managing for biodiversity IS managing for sustainability and yet there are few examples of corporate strategy that treat the subject in this way.

This shouldn’t be a surprise, and the fact that it sounds idyllic is testament to the amazing job we have done of convincing ourselves that we are not actually a part of biodiversity, that we are not in fact biological organisms at all, and that we exist above and beyond any sort of functioning, or misfunctioning, ecosystem.

A reappraisal of biodiversity in sustainability practice plugs us usefully back into the ecosystems we share with the organic and inorganic world. We can build better habitats for humans and shape places that are better for people, when they are also better for wildlife (because people are wildlife). The UK’s 25-year Environment Plan is already bending policy in this direction and there are good reasons to be ahead of its commitment to change.

The more interesting, diverse and complex an urban design for biodiversity, the richer the suite of animals and plants that results, and the more immediate and lasting the effects on the social, economic and environmental performance of buildings and the urban volume between. Ecological design and management gathers up and combines the central threads of the sustainability agenda, in the management of wind, water and heat, in adaptations to climate change, in the capture and cycling of nutrients and pollutants, the reuse of materials for biologically favourable outcomes, and ultimately in the mental and physical wellbeing of tenants, residents, businesses and communities in the places we inhabit. By using ecological leverage and demonstrating gains for biodiversity, we can be growing human resilience and creating a more sustainable living and working environment.

Ian Boyd

What are 'Nature-Based Solutions'?

Have you heard anyone refer to ‘Nature-Based Solutions’ yet? If you haven’t it’s probably just a matter of time before you do! ‘Ecosystem Services’ is perhaps a more common term but what does it actually mean?

Our ecologist and co-founder Ian Boyd explains here what they mean in simple terms…..

What is The 5th International Marine Conservation Conference?

According to the organisers of the 5th IMCC, those active in conservation of the world’s oceans must go beyond science and use policy and management to catalyze effective and positive change. The Society for Conservation Biology's ‘International Marine Conservation Congress’ (IMCC) in Borneo this week will bring together conservation professionals and students from across the planet to help develop new and powerful tools to further marine conservation science and policy. This year Artecology will be represented by Dr Alice Hall from Bournemouth University whose PhD included a comprehensive study of our Vertipool system. Alice’s talk at the IMCC5 in Borneo will suggest that novel green infrastructure engineering techniques can mitigate for habitat loss caused be sea level rise by creating manmade habitable intertidal structures.

Find out more about IMCC5 here https://conbio.org/mini-sites/imcc5/